Double Take

Double take, n. A delayed reaction to a situation, sight of a person, etc. … Also, a second, often more detailed, look.
(http://www.oed.com/ (accessed 23 August 2012).

Architektonika 1 (15 September 2011 – 12 February 2012) and Architektonika 2 (5 April 2012 – 13 January 2013) include artworks with an architectural interest selected from the Friedrich Christian Flick Collection in the Hamburger Bahnhof and the Nationalgalerie’s collection, as well as works loaned and some made specially for the exhibition. While Architektonika 1 focused on the sculptural and visual qualities of architectural structures, Architektonika 2 dealt with art’s relation to urban and social issues. A number of works appeared in both exhibitions, but others were removed after Architektonika 1, and new pieces added for Architektonika 2, resulting in a kind of double take: some works were seen once, and others twice, the latter encountered in the same location, but in a context altered by new additions, inviting those same works to be seen, again, differently.

If at the strategic level the decision to curate an exhibition of two parts or stages, where certain artworks appear twice, can be considered a form of double take, then at the level of experience, other aspects of double take also occur. Works produced at different historical moments, but which offer a range of perspectives on a specific architectural theme, have been carefully paired to exchange views with one another, and invite the viewer to consider how the architectural issues set out by one work can be rethought when positioned next to another. This essay takes up different positions in the exhibition, reflecting on how the juxtaposition of works from the 1960s with art from a later period, allows your situation in the gallery to influence your interpretation of history, such that contemporary works frame acts of looking back, while the aura of an early icon might anticipate your response to that which comes later.

Publication Details: ‘Double Take’, Architektonika, Gabriele Knapstein and Matilda Felix (eds) (Berlin Hamburger Bahnhof, 2013).

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http://www.hamburgerbahnhof.de/exhibition.php?lang=en&id=36493

Images: 1-2. Marjetica Potrč, Caracas: The Growing Houses (2012), Architektonika 2, Berlin Hamburger Bahnhof, 2012. (Photograph: Mohamad Hafeda).

3. Carl André, 07515 Karlsplatz (1992), Architektonika 1 & 2, Berlin Hamburger Bahnhof, 2012. (Photograph: Mohamad Hafeda).

4. Sol LeWitt Modular Cube (1970) and Dan Graham, Homes for America (1971-1972), Architektonika 1 & 2, Berlin Hamburger Bahnhof, 2012. (Photograph: Mohamad Hafeda).

5. Peter Fischli & David Weiss, Siedlungen, Agglomerationen (1992/1997) and Andrea Pichl, Doublebind (2011), Architektonika 2, Berlin Hamburger Bahnhof, 2012. (Photograph: Mohamad Hafeda).

6-7. Andrea Pichl’s Doublebind (2011), Architektonika 2, Berlin Hamburger Bahnhof, 2012. (Photograph: Mohamad Hafeda).

8. Rachel Khedoori’s Untitled (Model) (2000), Architektonika 2, Berlin Hamburger Bahnhof, 2012. (Photograph: Mohamad Hafeda).

9. Hermann Pitz, Ohne Titel (1986), Architektonika 2, Berlin Hamburger Bahnhof, 2012. (Photograph: Mohamad Hafeda).

10. Hermann Pitz, Wedding Therese (1984), Architektonika 2, Berlin Hamburger Bahnhof, 2012. (Photograph: Mohamad Hafeda).

11. Stan Douglas, Aufgegebene Gewächshäuser des Gartenbauamtes, Am Schlaatz (1994-1995/2003), Architektonika 2, Berlin Hamburger Bahnhof, 2012. (Photograph: Mohamad Hafeda).

12. Nina Fischer & Maroan el Sani with Carsten Nicolai, Klub der Republik (2002), Architektonika 2, Berlin Hamburger Bahnhof, 2012. (Photograph: Mohamad Hafeda).

13-4. Dieter Roth, Gartenskulptur, (1968–), Architektonika 2, Berlin Hamburger Bahnhof, 2012. (Photograph: Mohamad Hafeda).

15-6. Jürgen Albrecht’s Orte (2011)¬, Architektonika 2, Berlin Hamburger Bahnhof, 2012. (Photograph: Mohamad Hafeda).

17. Dan Graham and Jeff Wall, The Children’s Pavilion (1989 and 1991), Architektonika 2, Berlin Hamburger Bahnhof, 2012. (Photograph: Mohamad Hafeda).

18. Jeff Wall, Little Children (1988); Dan Graham and Jeff Wall, The Children’s Pavilion (1989 and 1991); Tobias Zielony, Vele (2009–2010), Architektonika 2, Berlin Hamburger Bahnhof, 2012. (Photograph: Mohamad Hafeda).

19-20. Bruce Nauman’s, Room with My Soul Left Out, Room That Does Not Care (1984), Architektonika 1 & 2, Berlin Hamburger Bahnhof, 2012. (Photograph: Mohamad Hafeda).
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